Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8333
Title: Short-term treatment outcomes in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 and hepatitis B virus co-infections
Authors: Sagoe, Kwamena W C
Duedu, Kwabena O
Ziga, Francesca
Agyei, Afrakoma A
Adiku, Theophilus K
Lartey, Margaret
Mingle, Julius A A
Arens, Max
Issue Date: 2-Jun-2016
Citation: Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials. 2016 Jun 02;15(1):38
Abstract: Abstract Background Co-infection of HIV with HBV is common in West Africa but little information is available on the effects of HBV on short-term therapy for HIV patients. A 28 day longitudinal study was conducted to examine short-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) outcomes in HIV infected individuals with HBV co-infection. Methods Plasma from 18 HIV infected individuals co-infected with HBV and matched controls with only HIV infection were obtained at initiation, and 7 and 28 days after ART. HIV-1 viral load changes were monitored. Clinical and demographic data were also obtained from patient folders, and HIV-1 drug resistance mutation and subtype analysis performed. Results The presence of HBV co-infection did not significantly affect HIV-1 viral load changes within 7 or 28 days. The CD4+ counts on the other hand of patients significantly affected the magnitude of HIV-1 viral load decline after 7 days (ρ = −0.441, p = 0.040), while the pre-ART HIV-1 VL (ρ = 0.844, p = <0.001) and sex (U = 19.0, p = 0.020) also determined HIV-1 viral load outcomes after 28 days of ART. Even though the geometric sensitivity score of HIV-1 strains were influenced by the HIV-1 subtypes (U = 56.00; p = 0.036), it was not a confounder for ART outcomes. Conclusions There may be the need to consider the confounder effects of sex, pre-ART CD4+, and pre-ART HIV-1 viral load in the discourse on HIV and HBV co-infection.
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12941-016-0152-2
http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8333
Appears in Collections:Biomed Articles

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