Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8097
Title: Investigation of the risk of infection of urinary schistosomiasis at Mahem and Galilea communities in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana.
Authors: Aboagye, I.F.
Edoh, D.
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: West African Journal of Applied Ecology,
Citation: West African Journal of Applied Ecology, 15: 37-44.
Abstract: Urinary schistosomiasis is of great public health importance in developing countries. It has adverse economic and health implications on residents living in endemic areas. Various factors including human behaviour are known to play key role in the transmission of the disease. The knowledge of the levels of risk of infection of urinary schistosomiasis and people’s perception will be an important tool in its control. The study determined the prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis and the risk of infection in some communities near the Weija lake in the Ga District. It assessed the knowledge base of the subjects on the disease and its impact on transmission. Data were collected on demographic variables, some behavioural activities in water bodies, knowledge base on the disease and sanitary facilities. Urine samples were analysed using the centrifugation technique. The percentage prevalence for Mahem and Galilea were 58% and 49%, respectively. The difference in prevalence was insignificant; 0.09 (-0.04, 0.21; P < 0.426). Bloody urine was associated with high risk of infection; OR of 4.55 (2.82, 7.36); P < 0.001. Subjects with primary level of education and invariably below 26 years of age had about two times the risk of infection; OR of 2.12 (1.13, 3.97); P < 0.02. The communities had 52% prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis. Frequent contacts and use of the infested lake were associated with infection. Educational intervention alone may not be effective in the control of the disease. The use of an integrated approach should be given favourable consideration.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8097
Appears in Collections:Department of Animal Biology and Conservation Science (DABCS)

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