Images of Rape in African Fiction: Between the Assumed Fatality of Violence and the Cry for Justice

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dc.contributor.author Asaah, A.H.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-03-29T18:10:31Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-14T12:44:25Z
dc.date.available 2012-03-29T18:10:31Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-14T12:44:25Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.uri http://197.255.68.203/handle/123456789/458
dc.description.abstract A horrendous aspect of patriarchy and dominator ideology, rape has in recent times captured the attention of civil society and the imagination of creative writers. The frequency of rape in peacetime, traditional, colonial, liberation war, and civil war contexts, since the dawn of time, seems to suggest that this gendered violence is inevitable. The paper argues that in presenting various images of rape, no matter how traumatizing, writers seek to draw attention to the crime and even more importantly, to the need to halt its frequency and dispel its aura of fatality. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Annales Aequatoria (28): 415-437 en_US
dc.subject Rape en_US
dc.subject Violence en_US
dc.subject Patriarchy en_US
dc.subject Justice en_US
dc.subject Civil Society en_US
dc.subject War en_US
dc.subject Fatality en_US
dc.subject Sensitization en_US
dc.title Images of Rape in African Fiction: Between the Assumed Fatality of Violence and the Cry for Justice en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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