Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/4192
Title: Absolute levels and ratios of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in vitro predict clinical immunity to plasmodium falciparum malaria.
Authors: Dodoo, D.
Omer, F. M.
Todd, J.
Akanmori, B. D.
Koram, K.A.
Riley, E.M.
Keywords: EMTREE drug terms: cytokine; gamma interferon; hemoglobin; interleukin 10; interleukin 12; phytohemagglutinin; transforming growth factor beta; tumor necrosis factor alpha EMTREE medical terms: adolescent; adult; anemia; article; cellular immunity; child; cytokine production; fever; Ghana; host resistance; human; immune response; immunity; infection sensitivity; major clinical study; malaria falciparum; nonhuman; parasitemia; Plasmodium falciparum; priority journal; schizont
Issue Date: Apr-2002
Citation: Dodoo, D., Omer, F. M., Todd, J., Akanmori, B. D., Koram, K. A., & Riley, E. M. (2002). Absolute levels and ratios of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in vitro predict clinical immunity to plasmodium falciparum malaria. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 185(7), 971-979
Abstract: The relationship between malaria-related outcomes and cytokine production in whole blood cultures associated with cellular immune responses and immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria was examined in a study in southern Ghana. Production of malaria-specific interferon (IFN)-γ was associated with reduced risk of fever and clinical malaria. Protective IFN-γ responses were induced by live schizonts but not by dead parasites. Production of malaria-specific tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was associated with reduced risk of fever during follow-up. Baseline levels of TNF-α and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced interleukin (IL)-10 were positively associated with hemoglobin concentration. IL-12 production was associated with reduced risk of parasitemia. PHA-induced transforming growth factor-β production was associated with reduced risk of fever during follow-up. High ratios of proinflammatory to anti-inflammatory cytokines were associated with increased risk of fever and higher hemoglobin concentrations. Thus, absolute levels and ratios of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines influence susceptibility to infection, clinical disease, and anemia. These data contradict data from cross-sectional clinical studies and indicate a need for detailed analysis of the relationship between cellular immunity to malaria and resistance to disease.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/4192
ISSN: 00221899
Appears in Collections:Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research

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