Incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic plasmodium falciparum infection following curative therapy in adult residents of northern Ghana.

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dc.contributor.author Owusu-Agyei, S.
dc.contributor.author Koram, K.A.
dc.contributor.author Baird, J.K.
dc.contributor.author Utz, G.C.
dc.contributor.author Binka, F.N.
dc.contributor.author Nkrumah, F.K.
dc.contributor.author Fryauff, D.J.
dc.contributor.author Hoffman, S.L.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-06-21T14:05:46Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-16T13:01:47Z
dc.date.available 2013-06-21T14:05:46Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-16T13:01:47Z
dc.date.issued 2001
dc.identifier.citation Owusu-Agyei, S., Koram, K. A., Baird, J. K., Utz, G. C., Binka, F. N., Nkrumah, F. K., . . . Hoffman, S. L. (2001). Incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic plasmodium falciparum infection following curative therapy in adult residents of northern Ghana. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 65(3), 197-203. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hinari-gw.who.int/whalecomwww.ajtmh.org/whalecom0/content/65/3/197.long
dc.identifier.uri http://197.255.68.203/handle/123456789/3850
dc.description.abstract Adult residents of holoendemic malaria regions in Africa have a naturally acquired immunity (NAI) to malaria that renders them more resistant to new infections, limits parasitemia, and reduces the frequency and severity of illness. Given such attributes, it is not clear how one might evaluate drug or vaccine efficacy in adults without serious confounding. To determine symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria attack rates in adults of northern Ghana, 197 men and women underwent curative therapy for any pre-existing malaria infections at the start of the high transmission (wet) season. They were monitored for first parasitemia and first clinical episode of infection by Plasmodium falciparum over a 20-week period (May-October 1996). The cumulative incidence of primary infection by P. falciparum was 0.98 and incidence density of infection was calculated to be 7.0 cases/person-year. Symptoms were reported by 19.5% of the individuals at the time of first recurrent parasitemia. Incidence of infection, parasite density, and the frequency of symptoms were comparable in males and females. The results suggest that NAI did not provide these adults with significant defense against rapid re-infection and suggest that this population-infection design could serve to demonstrate the efficacy of a drug or vaccine in preventing parasitemia. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship The work was supported by the Naval Medical Research Center independent research initiative funds and the STOF6.1 work unit 61102AA0101.BXF.1431 of the Military Infectious Disease Research Program. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene en_US
dc.title Incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic plasmodium falciparum infection following curative therapy in adult residents of northern Ghana. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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  • Parasitology Department [202]
    The Department of Parasitology conducts research into parasitic diseases of public health importance with the overall goal of reducing their transmission and the heavy disease burden that they impose on affected populations. The Department maintains focus on parasitic diseases in general. These include major diseases such as malaria, and others listed under the Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) control initiative such as, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

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