Variable clinical expression of homozygous beta thalassaemia in a Ghanaian family.

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dc.contributor.author Nkrumah, F.K.
dc.contributor.author Yawson, G.I.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-06-20T13:39:36Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-16T13:01:50Z
dc.date.available 2013-06-20T13:39:36Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-16T13:01:50Z
dc.date.issued 1975
dc.identifier.citation Nkrumah, F. K., & Yawson, G. I. (1975). Variable clinical expression of homozygous beta thalassaemia in a Ghanaian family. Ghana Medical Journal, 14(2), 92-96. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://197.255.68.203/handle/123456789/3755
dc.description.abstract In spite of the relatively high frequency of beta thalassemia genes in some African populations, reported cases of homozygous beta thalassemia are rare. A Ghanaian family is presented in which 3 siblings have the hematological findings and the necessary genetic background compatible with the diagnosis of homozygous beta thalassemia. The propositus has a clinically severe disease with transfusion dependency (thalassemia major) while the disease in the other 2 siblings appears to be clinically much milder (thalassemia intermedia). It is suggested that other genetic factors may be responsible for the variable clinical expression of the disease in this family. Documentation and follow up of more cases of homozygous beta thalassemia will greatly help to delineate the clinical and genetic patterns of the disease in Africa. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Ghana Medical Journal en_US
dc.title Variable clinical expression of homozygous beta thalassaemia in a Ghanaian family. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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    The Epidemiology Department contributes to the mission of the institute through basic and applied epidemiological research on, but not limited to, malaria and other diseases of public health importance. It is also home to the Social Science Unit of the Institute, including the Health Support Centre for HIV/AIDS and other communicable and noncommunicable health problems.

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