Cognisance of magnetic resonance imaging-induced vertigo and supported care: A study among a cohort of MRI radiographers in a country in West Africa

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dc.contributor.author Botwe, B.O.
dc.contributor.author Antwi, W.K.
dc.contributor.author Vormawor, A.M.
dc.contributor.author Oblitey, J.N.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-09T09:19:19Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-09T09:19:19Z
dc.date.issued 2020-06-12
dc.identifier.citation Botwe BO et al., Cognisance of magnetic resonance imaging-induced vertigo and supported care: A study among a cohort of MRI radiographers in a country in West Africa, Radiography, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radi.2020.05.007 en_US
dc.identifier.other https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radi.2020.05.007
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/35502
dc.description Research Article en_US
dc.description.abstract Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can induce vertigo in patients undergoing such examinations. The severity of the vertigo is thought to increase with higher magnetic field strengths and could cause a patient to fall. The study assessed the awareness levels on MRI-induced vertigo among a cohort of MRI radiographers and their perspectives on the care that should be administered to patients post MRI examinations. Methods: The study utilized a quantitative cross-sectional research design and a questionnaire. Out of a total of 40 MRI-radiographers identified nationwide, 31 participated in the study. Statistical Package for Social Sciences v.21.0 was used to analyse the data. Results: Most participants (n ¼ 21, 67.7%) were aware of MRI-induced vertigo. Many knew that patients (able and weaker) need to be assisted off the couch (n ¼ 28, 90.3%) and escorted to the changing rooms post MRI examinations (n ¼ 31,100%). There were statistically significant associations between the size of magnetic field strength used by the participants and their level of awareness about MRI-induced vertigo (r ¼ 0.691, p ¼ 0.003), appreciation of the needed support for patients post MRI examinations (r ¼ 0.530, p ¼ 0.041) and the frequency of occurrence of MRI-induced vertigo among their patients (r ¼ 0.530, p ¼ 0.001). Conclusion: The radiographers were mostly cognisant of MRI-induced vertigo and the supported care they were supposed to administer to their patients. The size of magnetic field strength used by the participants correlated with their level of awareness about MRI-induced vertigo and their appreciation of the needed support for patients post MRI examinations. Implication for practice: The study highlights the need for a refresher training to expand the knowledgebase of a few of the radiographers who were not very cognisant about MRI-induced vertigo. © 2020 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Radiography en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries 2020;
dc.subject Patient support en_US
dc.subject Awareness en_US
dc.subject Vertigo en_US
dc.subject MRI en_US
dc.subject Dizziness en_US
dc.title Cognisance of magnetic resonance imaging-induced vertigo and supported care: A study among a cohort of MRI radiographers in a country in West Africa en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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