Impact of an Irrigation Dam on the Transmission and Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in a Seasonal Malaria Transmission Area of Northern Ghana

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dc.contributor.author Kyei-Baafour, E.
dc.contributor.author Tornyigah, B.
dc.contributor.author Buade, B.
dc.contributor.author Bimi, L.
dc.contributor.author Oduro, A.R.
dc.contributor.author Koram, K.A.
dc.contributor.author Gyan, B.A.
dc.contributor.author Kusi, K.A.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-26T10:48:11Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-26T10:48:11Z
dc.date.issued 2020-03-19
dc.identifier.issn https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/1386587
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/35367
dc.description Research Article en_US
dc.description.abstract Water bodies such as dams are known to alter the local transmission patterns of a number of infectious diseases, especially those transmitted by insects and other arthropod vectors. (e impact of an irrigation dam on submicroscopic asexual parasite carriage in individuals living in a seasonal malaria transmission area of northern Ghana was investigated. A total of 288 archived DNA samples from two cross-sectional surveys in two communities in the Bongo District of Northern Ghana were analysed. Parasite density was determined by light microscopy and PCR, and parasite diversity was assessed by genotyping of the polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum msp2 block-3 region. Submicroscopic parasitaemia was estimated as the proportional difference between positive samples identified by PCR and microscopy. Dry season submicroscopic parasite prevalence was significantly higher (71.0%, p = 0.013) at the dam site compared with the nondam site (49.2%). Similarly, wet season submicroscopic parasite prevalence was significantly higher at the dam site (54.5%, p = 0.008) compared with the nondam site (33.0%). (ere was no difference in parasite density between sites in the dry season (p = 0.90) and in the wet season (p < 0.85). Multiplicity of infection (MOI) based on PCR data was significantly higher at the dam site compared with the nondam site during the dry season (p < 0.0001) but similar between sites during the wet season. MOI at the nondam site was significantly higher in the wet season than in the dry season (2.49, 1.26, p < 0.0001) but similar between seasons at the dam site. Multivariate analysis showed higher odds of carrying submicroscopic parasites at the dam site in both dry season (OR = 7.46, 95% CI = 3.07–18.15) and in wet season (OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.04–2.86). (e study findings suggest that large water bodies impact year-round carriage of submicroscopic parasites and sustain Plasmodium transmission en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation under the Postdoctoral and Postgraduate Training in Infectious Diseases Research awarded to the Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (Global Health Grant number OPP52155). en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Tropical Medicine en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries 2020;
dc.subject malaria en_US
dc.subject Plasmodium en_US
dc.subject submicroscopic en_US
dc.subject Ghana en_US
dc.title Impact of an Irrigation Dam on the Transmission and Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in a Seasonal Malaria Transmission Area of Northern Ghana en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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  • Immunology Department [184]
    The Department of Immunology conducts research in the field of immunology of infectious and non-infectious diseases. The Department has the overall goal of contributing knowledge to better diagnosis, management, control and prevention of infectious and non-infectious diseases in Ghana and worldwide. This is consistent with the overall strategy of the Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (NMIMR) and in line with the strategy of the College of Health Sciences of the University of Ghana.

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