Malaria in urban and rural areas of southern Ghana: A survey of parasitaemia, antibodies, and antimalarial practices.

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dc.contributor.author Gardiner, C.
dc.contributor.author Biggar, R.J.
dc.contributor.author Collins, W.E.
dc.contributor.author Nkrumah, F.K.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-06-17T16:06:07Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-16T13:17:20Z
dc.date.available 2013-06-17T16:06:07Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-16T13:17:20Z
dc.date.issued 1984
dc.identifier.citation Gardiner, C., Biggar, R. J., Collins, W. E., & Nkrumah, F. K. (1984). Malaria in urban and rural areas of southern Ghana: A survey of parasitaemia, antibodies, and antimalarial practices. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 62(4), 607-613. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://197.255.68.203/handle/123456789/3335
dc.description.abstract A comparative cross-sectional survey was undertaken in two populations, urban and rural, in southern Ghana to assess the impact of urbanization on the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and antibodies. At the same time, a survey of antimalarial practices was conducted on sample populations in the two communities. The results showed a low parasite rate (16%) and correspondingly low titres of malaria antibodies in a significant proportion of the urban community, particularly in children less than 10 years old. This was associated with widespread use in the urban community of antimalaria drugs, particularly chloroquine, as prophylaxis. The parasite rate in the rural community was 22%, and 97% of the sample population over 1 year of age had antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum. These results demonstrate that a substantial proportion of urban children are growing up with little exposure to malaria, even in a region considered endemic for malaria. The implications of these findings are discussed. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Bulletin of the World Health Organization en_US
dc.title Malaria in urban and rural areas of southern Ghana: A survey of parasitaemia, antibodies, and antimalarial practices. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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  • Epidemiology Department [262]
    The Epidemiology Department contributes to the mission of the institute through basic and applied epidemiological research on, but not limited to, malaria and other diseases of public health importance. It is also home to the Social Science Unit of the Institute, including the Health Support Centre for HIV/AIDS and other communicable and noncommunicable health problems.

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