Epidemiological aspects of non-human antibiotic usage and resistance: Implications for the control of antibiotic resistance in Ghana

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dc.contributor.author Donkor, E.S.
dc.contributor.author Newman, M.J.
dc.contributor.author Yeboah-Manu, D.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-06-17T08:18:53Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-16T13:08:27Z
dc.date.available 2013-06-17T08:18:53Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-16T13:08:27Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Donkor, E. S., Newman, M. J., & Yeboah-Manu, D. (2012). Epidemiological aspects of non-human antibiotic usage and resistance: Implications for the control of antibiotic resistance in Ghana. Tropical Medicine and International Health, 17(4), 462-468. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://197.255.68.203/handle/123456789/3242
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVES: To provide insights into the epidemiology of antibiotic usage in animal husbandry in Ghana and its effect on resistance. METHODS: Three hundred and ninety-five randomly sampled commercial livestock keepers who practised intensive or extensive farming were interviewed about their antibiotic usage practices using a structured questionnaire. Escherichia coli isolated from stool specimens of farmers and their animals were tested against eight antibiotics using the Kirby Bauer method. RESULTS: Ninety-eight percent (387) of the farmers used antibiotics on animals and the main purpose was to prevent infections in animals; 41% applied antibiotics monthly. The overall prevalence of multiple drug resistance among the E. coli isolates was 91.6%; rates in human and animal isolates were 70.6% and 97.7%, respectively. The prevalence of resistance in animal isolates to the various drugs ranged from 60.8% (amikacin) to 95.7% (ampicillin); the prevalence of resistance in human isolates to the drugs ranged from 2% (cefuroxime) to 94.1% (gentamicin). Animal E. coli isolates showed higher resistance than that of human isolates for five of eight drugs tested. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that antibiotic usage in animal husbandry in Ghana is more driven by the interest of livestock keepers to prevent and treat animal infections than growth enhancement. Both animal and human E. coli showed high levels of antibiotic resistance, although resistance of animal isolates appeared to be higher than that of humans. There is the need for the development of an antibiotic-resistance management programme in Ghana that will focus simultaneously on human and animal use of antibiotics en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Tropical Medicine and International Health en_US
dc.title Epidemiological aspects of non-human antibiotic usage and resistance: Implications for the control of antibiotic resistance in Ghana en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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  • Bacteriology Department [105]
    The Bacteriology Department aims to improve the quality of life first for Ghanaians and the world at large by conducting research into bacterial diseases of public health importance to Ghana and globally. In addition to working on enteric pathogens and sexually transmitted diseases, the department’s current main focus is on the two most important mycobacterial diseases of public health importance to Ghana, namely Buruli ulcer (BU) and tuberculosis (TB).

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