Plasmodium and intestinal parasite perturbations of the infected host’s inflammatory responses: a systematic review

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dc.contributor.author Lo, A.C.
dc.contributor.author Faye, B.
dc.contributor.author Gyan, B.A.
dc.contributor.author Amoah, L.E.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-03T11:03:56Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-03T11:03:56Z
dc.date.issued 2018-07
dc.identifier.other https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-2948-8
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/31222
dc.description.abstract Co-infection of malaria and intestinal parasites is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa and causes severe disease especially among the poorest populations. It has been shown that an intestinal parasite (helminth), mixed intestinal helminth or Plasmodium parasite infection in a human induces a wide range of cytokine responses, including anti-inflammatory, pro-inflammatory as well as regulatory cytokines. Although immunological interactions have been suggested to occur during a concurrent infection of helminths and Plasmodium parasites, different conclusions have been drawn on the influence this co-infection has on cytokine production. This review briefly discusses patterns of selected cytokine (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α and INF-γ) responses associated with infections caused by Plasmodium, intestinal parasites as well as a Plasmodium-helminth co-infection. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Parasites and Vectors en_US
dc.title Plasmodium and intestinal parasite perturbations of the infected host’s inflammatory responses: a systematic review en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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  • Parasitology Department [238]
    The Department of Parasitology conducts research into parasitic diseases of public health importance with the overall goal of reducing their transmission and the heavy disease burden that they impose on affected populations. The Department maintains focus on parasitic diseases in general. These include major diseases such as malaria, and others listed under the Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) control initiative such as, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

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