Comparative genomics of Mycobacterium africanum Lineage 5 and Lineage 6 from Ghana suggests distinct ecological niches

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dc.contributor.author Otchere, I.D.
dc.contributor.author Coscollá, M.
dc.contributor.author Sánchez-Busó, L.
dc.contributor.author Asante-Poku, A.
dc.contributor.author Brites, D.
dc.contributor.author Loiseau, C.
dc.contributor.author Meehan, C.
dc.contributor.author Osei-Wusu, S.
dc.contributor.author Forson, A.
dc.contributor.author Laryea, C.et.al.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-17T09:58:53Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-17T09:58:53Z
dc.date.issued 2018-07
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/30816
dc.description.abstract Mycobacterium africanum (Maf) causes a substantial proportion of human tuberculosis in some countries of West Africa, but little is known on this pathogen. We compared the genomes of 253 Maf clinical isolates from Ghana, including N = 175 Lineage 5 (L5) and N = 78 Lineage 6 (L6). We found that the genomic diversity of L6 was higher than in L5 despite the smaller sample size. Regulatory proteins appeared to evolve neutrally in L5 but under purifying selection in L6. Even though over 90% of the human T cell epitopes were conserved in both lineages, L6 showed a higher ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous single nucleotide variation in these epitopes overall compared to L5. Of the 10% human T cell epitopes that were variable, most carried mutations that were lineage-specific. Our findings indicate that Maf L5 and L6 differ in some of their population genomic characteristics, possibly reflecting different selection pressures linked to distinct ecological niches. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Scientific Reports en_US
dc.title Comparative genomics of Mycobacterium africanum Lineage 5 and Lineage 6 from Ghana suggests distinct ecological niches en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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  • Bacteriology Department [108]
    The Bacteriology Department aims to improve the quality of life first for Ghanaians and the world at large by conducting research into bacterial diseases of public health importance to Ghana and globally. In addition to working on enteric pathogens and sexually transmitted diseases, the department’s current main focus is on the two most important mycobacterial diseases of public health importance to Ghana, namely Buruli ulcer (BU) and tuberculosis (TB).

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