Subjective well‐being and political participation: Empirical evidence from Ghana

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dc.contributor.author Sulemana, I.
dc.contributor.author Agyapong, E.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-07T11:18:35Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-07T11:18:35Z
dc.date.issued 2019-04
dc.identifier.other https://doi.org/10.1111/rode.12592
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/30563
dc.description.abstract A large, extant literature examines the effect of political factors on individual subjective well-being. These studies have treated political factors as a cause and subjective well-being as an effect. A sparse but growing literature now advances the argument that subjective well-being is a cause and voting or political participation an effect. In this paper we examine whether subjective well-being influences voting and political participation in Ghana. Using data from Wave 6 of the World Values Survey in Ghana, we find that subjective well-being influences neither voting nor protest behavior. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Review of Development Economics en_US
dc.subject Africa en_US
dc.subject Democracy en_US
dc.subject Ghana en_US
dc.subject Political participation en_US
dc.subject Subjective well-being en_US
dc.subject Voting en_US
dc.title Subjective well‐being and political participation: Empirical evidence from Ghana en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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