Does knowledge on socio-cultural factors associated with maternal mortality affect maternal health decisions? A cross-sectional study of the Greater Accra region of Ghana

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Yarney, L.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-22T10:24:34Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-22T10:24:34Z
dc.date.issued 2019-01
dc.identifier.other https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-019-2197-7
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/30191
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: The concern of all maternal health stakeholders is to improve maternal health and reduce maternal deaths to the barest minimum. This remains elusive in low and middle-income countries as the majority of factors that drive maternal deaths stem from the socio-cultural environment especially in rural settings. This study was aimed at finding out if knowledge on socio-cultural factors related to maternal mortality affects maternal health decisions in rural Ghana. METHODS: Community-based cross-sectional in design, the study involved 233 participants from 3 rural districts in the Greater Accra Region. Mixed-method of data collection was employed after informed consent. Quantitative data were analyzed using simple statistics, Fisher's Exact Test of independence and crude odds ratio were used to interpret the results, whilst the FGDs were recorded, transcribed and analyzed based on themes. RESULTS: Statistically, significant relationship exists between all the socio-cultural factors studied (Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs), religious beliefs and practices, herbal concoctions, and pregnancy and childbirth-related taboos) and maternal health decisions (p = 0.001 for all the variables) with very strong associations between maternal health decisions and knowledge on pregnancy and childbirth related taboos, TBA patronage, and religious beliefs and practices (OR = 21.06; 13; 7.28 respectively). However, misconceptions on factors associated with maternal mortality deeply rooted in rural communities partly explain why maternal morbidity and mortality are persistent in Ghana. CONCLUSION: Meaningful and successful interventions on maternal mortality can only be achieved if misconceptions on causes of maternal mortality especially in rural areas of the country are tackled through mass education of communities. This should be done consistently over a long period of time for sustained behavioral change. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth en_US
dc.subject Socio-cultural factors en_US
dc.subject Maternal mortality en_US
dc.subject Maternal health decision en_US
dc.subject Ghana en_US
dc.title Does knowledge on socio-cultural factors associated with maternal mortality affect maternal health decisions? A cross-sectional study of the Greater Accra region of Ghana en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UGSpace


Browse

My Account