Traditional antimalarial phytotherapy remedies in herbal markets in southern Ghana

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dc.contributor.author Asase, A.
dc.contributor.author Oppong-Mensah, G.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-24T10:33:34Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-24T10:33:34Z
dc.date.issued 2009-09
dc.identifier.other https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2009.09.008
dc.identifier.other Volume 126, Issue 3, Pages 492-499
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/29497
dc.description.abstract Ethnopharmacological relevance: Although traditional antimalarial plant remedies in herbal markets are a very important component of the health care system in Ghana this has not been previously studied to allow for the formulation of effective strategy for malaria control in Ghana. Aim of study: The main objective of the present study was to collect and analyse data on the antimalarial plant remedies in herbal markets in southern Ghana. Materials and methods: Herborists were interviewed using a validated questionnaire and species of plants were identified using a combination of field photo guides, local names and voucher specimens. Results: A total of 71 herborists (95.8% female) were interviewed. There were potential correlations between different parameters and variables such as ethnic groups, type of vendor and age-groups. The study revealed 29 species of plants belonging to 22 families being sold for the treatment of malaria. The detailed use of these plants is documented. The most frequently mentioned species of plants were Morinda lucida Benth., Indigofera sp. and Nauclea latifolia Sm. The majority (82.8%) of the plant materials were sold in the dried state and 6.9% were sold in fresh state. About 76.2% of the herbal remedies were sold throughout the year while 23.8% were scarce in the dry season. The cost of treatment of malaria using the herbal remedies ranged from 1 to 2 United States Dollars (USD). Conclusion: Standardization of names and authentication of plant materials using organoleptic, phytochemical and DNA barcoding techniques as well as further research on efficacy, safety and dosage prescriptions for both fresh and dried plant materials being sold for the treatment of malaria in southern Ghana are needed. © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Ethnopharmacology en_US
dc.subject Antimalarial plants en_US
dc.subject Ghana en_US
dc.subject Herbal markets en_US
dc.title Traditional antimalarial phytotherapy remedies in herbal markets in southern Ghana en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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