Enhanced toll-like receptor responsiveness associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in Plasmodium falciparum-infected children

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Hartgers, F.C.
dc.contributor.author Obeng, B.B.
dc.contributor.author Voskamp, A.
dc.contributor.author Larbi, I.A.
dc.contributor.author Amoah, A.S.et.al.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-12T11:34:30Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-12T11:34:30Z
dc.date.issued 2008-09
dc.identifier.other Vol.76(11): pp 5149-57
dc.identifier.other DOI: 10.1128/IAI.01579-07
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/29212
dc.description.abstract Acute Plasmodium falciparum infection is associated with strongly upregulated cytokine responses that are at least partly the result of activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Whether and how TLR expression/responsiveness changes upon malarial infection is, however, currently not well understood. To assess this, we examined expression of TLRs and used the TLR ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Pam3Cys to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from Ghanaian schoolchildren who live in a rural area where P. falciparum is endemic. Expression of TLR2 was higher, and responses to its ligand, Pam3Cys, were enhanced in P. falciparum-infected children compared to their uninfected counterparts. In cells from the same children, stimulation by Pam3Cys resulted in higher p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and higher cytokine production. In vitro experiments confirmed that preincubation of PBMCs with P. falciparum-infected red blood cells enhanced responsiveness to TLR ligands. Taken together, the data indicate that P. falciparum-infected children in areas where malaria is endemic have an altered innate immune system, which might be important for the balance between immunity and pathology when new infections are encountered or when novel vaccines are introduced. Copyright © 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Infection and Immunity en_US
dc.title Enhanced toll-like receptor responsiveness associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in Plasmodium falciparum-infected children en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Parasitology Department [253]
    The Department of Parasitology conducts research into parasitic diseases of public health importance with the overall goal of reducing their transmission and the heavy disease burden that they impose on affected populations. The Department maintains focus on parasitic diseases in general. These include major diseases such as malaria, and others listed under the Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) control initiative such as, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

Show simple item record

Search UGSpace


Browse

My Account