Agreement among Four Prevalence Metrics for Urogenital Schistosomiasis in the Eastern Region of Ghana

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dc.contributor.author Kosinski, K.C.
dc.contributor.author Kulinkina, A.V.
dc.contributor.author Tybor, D.
dc.contributor.author Osabutey, D.
dc.contributor.author Bosompem, K.M.
dc.contributor.author Naumova, E.N.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-14T09:25:27Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-14T09:25:27Z
dc.date.issued 2016-12
dc.identifier.other DOI: 10.1155/2016/7627358
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/27517
dc.description.abstract Few studies assess agreement among Schistosoma haematobium eggs, measured hematuria, and self-reported metrics. We assessed agreement among four metrics at a single time point and analyzed the stability of infection across two time points with a single metric. We used data from the Eastern Region of Ghana and constructed logistic regression models. Girls reporting macrohematuria were 4.1 times more likely to have measured hematuria than girls not reporting macrohematuria (CI95%: 2.1-7.9); girls who swim were 3.6 times more likely to have measured hematuria than nonswimmers (CI95%: 1.6-7.9). For boys, neither self-reported metric was predictive. Girls with measured hematuria in 2010 were 3.3 times more likely to be positive in 2012 (CI95%: 1.01-10.5), but boys showed no association. Boys with measured hematuria in 2008 were 6.0 times more likely to have measured hematuria in 2009 (CI95%: 1.5-23.9) and those with eggs in urine in 2008 were 4.8 times more likely to have eggs in urine in 2009 (CI95%: 1.2-18.8). For girls, measured hematuria in 2008 predicted a positive test in 2009 (OR = 2.8; CI95%: 1.1-6.8), but egg status did not. Agreement between dipstick results and eggs suggests continued dipstick used is appropriate. Self-reported swimming should be further examined. For effective disease monitoring, we recommend annual dipstick testing. © 2016 Karen Claire Kosinski et al. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher BioMed Research International en_US
dc.title Agreement among Four Prevalence Metrics for Urogenital Schistosomiasis in the Eastern Region of Ghana en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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  • Parasitology Department [253]
    The Department of Parasitology conducts research into parasitic diseases of public health importance with the overall goal of reducing their transmission and the heavy disease burden that they impose on affected populations. The Department maintains focus on parasitic diseases in general. These include major diseases such as malaria, and others listed under the Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) control initiative such as, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

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