Learning from epidemiological, clinical, and immunological studies on Mycobacterium africanum for improving current understanding of host–pathogen interactions, and for the development and evaluation of diagnostics, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for tuberculosis

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dc.contributor.author Zumla, A.
dc.contributor.author Otchere, I.D.
dc.contributor.author Mensah, G.I.
dc.contributor.author Asante-Poku, A.
dc.contributor.author Gehre, F.
dc.contributor.author Maeurer, M.
dc.contributor.author Bates, M.
dc.contributor.author Mwaba, P.
dc.contributor.author Ntoumi, F.
dc.contributor.author Yeboah-Manu, D.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-08T09:48:00Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-08T09:48:00Z
dc.date.issued 2017-03
dc.identifier.other Volume 56, Pages 126-129
dc.identifier.other https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2016.12.003
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/27358
dc.description.abstract Mycobacterium africanum comprises two phylogenetic lineages within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). M. africanum was first described and isolated in 1968 from the sputum of a Senegalese patient with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and it has been identified increasingly as an important cause of human TB, particularly prevalent in West Africa. The restricted geographical distribution of M. africanum, in contrast to the widespread global distribution of other species of MTBC, requires explanation. Available data indicate that M. africanum may also have important differences in transmission, pathogenesis, and host–pathogen interactions, which could affect the evaluation of new TB intervention tools (diagnostics and vaccines)–those currently in use and those under development. The unequal geographical distribution and spread of MTBC species means that individual research findings from one country or region cannot be generalized across the continent. Thus, generalizing data from previous and ongoing research studies on MTBC may be inaccurate and inappropriate. A major rethink is required regarding the design and structure of future clinical trials of new interventions. The West, Central, East, and Southern African EDCTP Networks of Excellence provide opportunities to take forward these pan-Africa studies. More investments into molecular, epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and immunological studies across the African continent are required to enable further understanding of host–M. africanum interactions, leading to the development of more specific diagnostics, biomarkers, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for TB. © 2016 The Author(s) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher International Journal of Infectious Diseases en_US
dc.subject Africa en_US
dc.subject Diagnostics en_US
dc.subject EDCTP en_US
dc.subject Host en_US
dc.subject Mycobacterium africanum en_US
dc.subject Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex en_US
dc.subject TB en_US
dc.subject Vaccines en_US
dc.title Learning from epidemiological, clinical, and immunological studies on Mycobacterium africanum for improving current understanding of host–pathogen interactions, and for the development and evaluation of diagnostics, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for tuberculosis en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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  • Bacteriology Department [105]
    The Bacteriology Department aims to improve the quality of life first for Ghanaians and the world at large by conducting research into bacterial diseases of public health importance to Ghana and globally. In addition to working on enteric pathogens and sexually transmitted diseases, the department’s current main focus is on the two most important mycobacterial diseases of public health importance to Ghana, namely Buruli ulcer (BU) and tuberculosis (TB).

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