Focus Group Research: Towards an Applicable Model for Africa

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dc.contributor.author Amoakohene, M.I.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-01-30T13:34:20Z
dc.date.available 2019-01-30T13:34:20Z
dc.date.issued 2005-01
dc.identifier.citation Amoakohene, M. I. (2005). Focus Group Research: Towards an Applicable Model for Africa. In K. Kwansah-Aidoo (Ed.), Topical Issues in Communications and Media Research, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2005, pp. 173-197. [ISBN: 1594542791] en_US
dc.identifier.isbn 1594542791
dc.identifier.other Chapter 10, pp 173-197
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/27124
dc.description.abstract Over the last two decades, African communication scholars, educationists and researchers have realised there exist “certain limitations of the western social research methods when used in the rural areas of Africa” (Obeng-Quaidoo, 1985, p. 109). It has been observed that many of the concepts and models learnt during postgraduate study in developed countries are sometimes not workable in developing countries due to problems of illiteracy, poverty and complex social structures. Limitations manifest when Western notions of social science research are used in much of Africa and other parts of the developing world, especially in rural areas, due to their peculiarities, which distinguish them from developed environments (Obeng-Quaidoo, 1983;1 Maynard-Tucker, 2000; Vissandjée, Abdool, & Dupéré, 2002; Winslow, Honein, & Elzubeir, 2002; Laverack & Brown, 2003;). Obeng-Quaidoo (1985) observes that even though “science is universal and transferable, the methodologies and technologies for obtaining scientific knowledge are not universal” (p. 110). He argues that discussions of “methodological innovations” should be situated within specific “cultural imperatives” (p. 110). Halloran (2002)2 argues in support of situating media studies in local environments because news processes (gathering, processing and dissemination or sharing) are impinged upon by many factors, some of which are political, sociological, cultural and economic. Similarly, social science research is impinged upon by the environment in which it is conducted. The “choice of research problems and of what methodological approach is used to study these problems,” is usually influenced by social and political factors (Priest, 1996, p. 5) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Topical Issues in Communications and Media Research, New York: Nova Science Publishers en_US
dc.title Focus Group Research: Towards an Applicable Model for Africa en_US
dc.type Book en_US


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