Reduction in the urinary aflatoxin M1 biomarker as an early indicator of the efficacy of dietary interventions to reduce exposure to aflatoxins

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dc.contributor.author Mitchell, N.J.
dc.contributor.author Kumi, J.
dc.contributor.author Johnson, N.M.
dc.contributor.author Dotse, E.
dc.contributor.author Marroquin-Cardona, A.
dc.contributor.author Wang, J.S.
dc.contributor.author Jolly, P.E.
dc.contributor.author Ankrah, N.-A.
dc.contributor.author Phillips, T.D.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-11T15:08:59Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-11T15:08:59Z
dc.date.issued 2013-05
dc.identifier.other https://doi.org/10.3109/1354750X.2013.798031
dc.identifier.other Volume 18, Issue 5, Pages 391-398
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/26332
dc.description.abstract Aflatoxin B1 is a persistent public health issue in Ghana. Assessment of AFB1 intervention efficacy is currently dependent on long-term biomarkers. This study was designed to determine whether daily AFM1 biomarker levels could be utilized as an early detection method for intervention efficacy. Participants were treated with a refined calcium montmorillonite clay (UPSN) or a placebo (calcium carbonate) in a crossover study. Urine samples were assessed for AFM1 levels daily. UPSN treatment reduced AFM1 biomarkers by 55% compared to the placebo. This is the first study to show that daily urinary AFM1 levels can be used as a biomarker of internal aflatoxin B1 exposure in short-term intervention trials to determine efficacy. © 2013 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Biomarkers en_US
dc.subject Aflatoxin en_US
dc.subject Enterosorption therapy en_US
dc.subject Ghana en_US
dc.subject Liver cancer en_US
dc.title Reduction in the urinary aflatoxin M1 biomarker as an early indicator of the efficacy of dietary interventions to reduce exposure to aflatoxins en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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  • Electron Microscopy Department [69]
    The main research focus of the Electron Microscopy and Histopathology Department in the past 20 years has been in the areas of enteric diarrhoeas with special emphasis on rotavirus. Through its diarrhoea surveillance studies, the Department has helped to firmly establish rotaviruses as a major cause of diarrhoea in children, and document the circulation of unusual rotavirus genotypes in Ghana. The Department has also recently expanded its diagnostic repertoire to include the identification and characterization of noroviruses, astroviruses, and other enteric viruses.

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