Comparative molecular analyses of invasive fall armyworm in Togo reveal strong similarities to populations from the eastern United States and the Greater Antilles

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dc.contributor.author Nagoshi, R.N.
dc.contributor.author Koffi, D.
dc.contributor.author Agboka, K.
dc.contributor.author Tounou, K.A.
dc.contributor.author Banerjee, R.
dc.contributor.author Jurat-Fuentes, J.L.
dc.contributor.author Meagher, R.L.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-25T16:22:31Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-25T16:22:31Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri 10.1371/journal.pone.0181982
dc.identifier.uri http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/22164
dc.description.abstract The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda, J.E. Smith) is a noctuid moth that is a major and ubiquitous agricultural pest in the Western Hemisphere. Infestations have recently been identified in several locations in Africa, indicating its establishment in the Eastern Hemisphere where it poses an immediate and significant economic threat. Genetic methods were used to characterize noctuid specimens infesting multiple cornfields in the African nation of Togo that were tentatively identified as fall armyworm by morphological criteria. Species identification was confirmed by DNA barcoding and the specimens were found to be primarily of the subgroup that preferentially infests corn and sorghum in the Western Hemisphere. The mitochondrial haplotype configuration was most similar to that found in the Caribbean region and the eastern coast of the United States, identifying these populations as the likely originating source of the Togo infestations. A genetic marker linked with resistance to the Cry1Fa toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) expressed in transgenic corn and common in Puerto Rico fall armyworm populations was not found in the Togo collections. These observations demonstrate the usefulness of genetic surveys to characterize fall armyworm populations from Africa. © 2017, Public Library of Science. All rights reserved. This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_US
dc.title Comparative molecular analyses of invasive fall armyworm in Togo reveal strong similarities to populations from the eastern United States and the Greater Antilles en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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