Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/21407
Title: The Supply and Demand Factors affecting the use of Insecticides treated Mosquito Nets in the Greater Accra Region
Authors: Osei-Akoto, I.
Yennuyar B.I.
University of Ghana, College of Humanities, Development Studies
Issue Date: Jul-2015
Publisher: University of Ghana
Abstract: Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in many parts of the world with many and varied effects. In Africa, malaria is a development problem because of its high prevalence in many countries in the continent. Insecticide-Treated mosquito Net (ITN) is one of the most effective measures used in preventing malaria. This is because, it acts as a physical barrier, preventing access by vector mosquitoes and thus providing personal protection against malaria to individuals using the ITN. In order to determine the supply and demand factors affecting the use of ITN, the study dwelled on two objectives: Firstly, to analyze the supply factors affecting the use of ITN in greater Accra region and lastly, to analyze the demand factors affecting the use of ITN. To obtain information on the above objectives, the research leaned on MICS4 2011 data set and data from the field, which was mainly qualitative information. MICS4 2011 data set was used to analyze the demand factors affecting the use of ITN whereas the field data was use to elicit information on the supply factors affecting the use of ITN and also information to triangulate with the results from MICS4 2011 data set. On the supply factors affecting the use of ITN, the study revealed that, the universal coverage system of one ITN to two persons, discontinuity of education on the use of ITN and the lack of or ineffective household monitoring and supervision are the factors likely to affect the use of ITNs in the region. On the demand side, the research established that, gender, age, locality, ethnicity, religion, education and wealth of household members were the factors likely to affect the use of ITN in the region. The result suggests that, relative to female, male household members are less likely to use ITN. Household members who dwell in urban areas are also less likely to use ITN than their counterparts in the rural areas. The results also revealed that, household members who were under the age 5 were more likely to use ITN than all the age groups. Ethnicity and religion had a positive and a significant relationship with ITN usage as Ewes were more likely to use ITNs than the other ethnic groups likewise household members who were affiliated to SDA were more likely to use ITN than the other religious groups. There was also a positive and a significant relationship between education of household head and ITN use. Household members who reported as having had middle or JHS and secondary or more education were more likely to use ITN than household heads with no education. Lastly, there was a negative and a significant relationship between wealth status of households and ITN usage, as households who falls within the poorest wealth status were more likely to use ITN than all the households in the rest of the wealth status. The study therefore finds that the policy on ITN use is pro-poor and recommends an expansion in ITN distribution to include more poor households, target more under 5 years children and women, intensify education on ITNs usage at programmes, institutions and the household level, massive scale-up in monitoring and supervision and a redefinition of the universal coverage system of one ITN to two people to one person one ITN.
Description: Thesis (MPhil) - University of Ghana, 2015
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/21407
Appears in Collections:Development Studies



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